Oxford Endovascular Make Brain Aneurysm Treatment Safer And More Effective

Oxford Endovascular Make Brain Aneurysm Treatment Safer And More Effective

It is estimated that about one in 50 people develop brain aneurysms each year, a weakened point in a blood vessel where the pulsing blood causes the wall of the vessel to balloon. If left untreated it can burst or rapture, causing intense pain and life threatening bleeding in the brain, resulting in serious brain damage or death. In fact, a third of people who develop brain aneurysms die, and over half of survivors will have disabilities. Existing treatment options of un-ruptured aneurysms have limitations, posing serious risk of bleeding or loss of blood flow to the brain. As a result, the risks may often outweigh the potential benefits of the therapies.

The Oxford-based startup Oxford Endovascular is developing a novel flow-diverter, called Oxiflow, an advanced tiny metallic mesh tube device for the minimally invasive treatment of brain aneurysms at risk of rupture. The device was designed by James Byrne, a Professor of Interventional Neuroradiology at the John Radcliffe Hospital and Zhong You, a Professor of Engineering at the University of Oxford.

The device is laser-cut from Nitinol, a Nickel Titanium alloy, and has shape memory. It can be posted into a catheter during surgery and inserted into the brain where it then opens up into a tiny mesh tube that fits into the natural shape of the blood vessel. This help divert the blood away from the aneurysm, allowing it to heal. The unique design allows it to be placed more accurately and safely than existing products, conforming to various blood vessel shapes and reducing the risk of complications.

Oxford Endovascular Make Brain Aneurysm Treatment Safer And More Effective
With important medical advances, treatment for brain aneurysms is more promising than it was several years ago. There are more effective and less invasive treatment options for patients, who for a long time have been told they have inoperable aneurysms. Flow diverters have gained popularity and have by many hospitals become the first-line treatment for all un-ruptured aneurysms. Despite their increasing popularity, current flow diverters have drawbacks and still many patients cannot be treated with current technologies.

Based on market feedback, Oxford Endovascular has developed the next generation flow diverters. Their device could dramatically improve patient outcomes and increase access to care, and the startup aim to treat blood vessels deeper in the brain that is not accessible with existing devices. Physicians are able to place the device more accurately and in a wider range of patients, ensuring treatment is both safer and more effective. This could have a major impact on thousands of patients around the world diagnosed with a brain aneurysm, preventing ruptures, as well as associated disability and death. A safer and more effective treatment option could not only significantly reduce associated costs, but eliminate the fear and uncertainty patients live with every day. It could end the constant wondering whether this will be the day their aneurysm ruptures, improving quality of life.

Oxford Endovascular was launched in December 2015 and is a spin-out from University of Oxford. The device was developed with support from the Wellcome Trust, Technikos and the University of Oxford, and the startup announced in 2016 they had raised £2 million from Oxford Sciences Innovation PLC, Parkwalk Advisors and other private investors. They have won BioTrinity’s 2017 ‘Perfect Pitch’ competition, ‘Best Pitch’ at BIO-Europe Spring StartUp Slam, and 'Best Medtech Startup' at the 2017 OBN Awards, and is expected to begin human clinical trial in 2018.